Annual Awards

Displayed here are the officers, civilian employees and citizens who have done outstanding work during the year. Read below the detailed accounts of these individuals and awards.

Award Descriptions

Life Saving Award
Medal of Valor
May be awarded to the employees who distinguish by performing courageous acts above-and-beyond the call of duty, and involving risk or imminent danger to their lives. Such acts must have been performed for the purpose of saving or protecting human life. Employees must perform acts so outstanding that it clearly distinguishes their courage from other forms of recognized bravery. There must be no margin of doubt or possibility or error in awarding this honor.
Ultimate Service Award
May be given in cases where an employee dies while on duty or while rendering direct service to the citizens of Salt Lake City under conditions that do not meet the guidelines set forth in the Medal of Valor Award.
Police Purple Heart Award
May be awarded to any sworn member who in the necessary performance of law enforcement functions, on or off duty, receives serious bodily injury, or posthumously to the next of kin in the name of those who are killed or die of wounds received in the line of duty. This award does not include injury in motor vehicle accidents unless special circumstances are determined to exist by the awards committee. The injury must not be the result of the employee's own negligence.
Police Medal
May be awarded to the employees who in the line of police duty, distinguished themselves by performing courageous acts involving rick of imminent serious personal injury for the purpose of saving or protecting human life; or, in the course of an extended investigation, demanding continuous exposure to grave personal hazard, and willingly accept such risk in the service of the Department; or, for extraordinarily credible and unusual police accomplishments.
Police Star
May be awarded to employees who, in the line of police duty, distinguish themselves by performing courageous acts involving personal hazard in protecting or saving human life; or similar acts necessary to effect an arrest to prevent the escape of a person who committed an act which seriously exposed any person to death or serious personal injury. Furthermore, the Police Star may be awarded to employees of the Department for performing highly credible and unusual police accomplishments.
Police Distinguished Service Medal
This medal is the Department's highest award for service and may be awarded to employees who distinguish themselves by performing exceptional service in a duty of great responsibility or of critical importance to law enforcement.
Police Meritorious Service Medal
May be awarded to employees who perform meritorious service similar to, but to a lesser degree than, that required for the Police Distinguished Service Medal.
Gold Star
Awarded to a Sergeant or above when they have received a multiple of the same award - may be worn over the pin
Nickel Star
Awarded to an Officer when they have received a multiple of the same award - may be worn over the pin
Police Distinguished Unit Citation
This citation is the Department's highest unit award and may be awarded to an organizational unit of the Department for bravery or outstanding service by its employees functioning as a team.
Police Meritorious Unit Citation
May be awarded to an organizational unit of the Department for bravery or outstanding to, but a lesser degree than, that required for the Police Department Unit Citation.
Public Service Medal of Valor
May be awarded to citizens who give their lives in service to the community or distinguish themselves by performing courageous acts beyond the call of civic duty and involving risk or imminent danger to their lives. Furthermore, such acts must have been performed for the purpose of saving or protecting human life. Citizens must perform acts so outstanding that it clearly distinguished their courage from other forms of recognized bravery. There must be no margin of doubt or possibility of error in awarding this honor.
Public Service Star
May be awarded to citizens who distinguish themselves by performing courageous acts involving personal hazard in protecting or saving human life, or similar acts necessary to effect the arrest or prevent the escape of a person who committed an act which seriously exposed any person to death or serious injury.
Partner in Public Safety
May be awarded to an employee of the community who aided Police Department members or rendered meritorious service to community law enforcement efforts
Police Tactical De-Escalation Medal
May be awarded to employees who, in the line of police duty, utilize exceptional tactical skills, verbal approaches and/or techniques to de-escalate a situation that could have resulted in the use of deadly force or used to sustain human life. This award will be presented monthly to employees that meet the above criteria and will be recognized at the annual Awards Gala.
Civilian Humanitarian Service Award
This medal is awarded for direct "hands-on" participation in an act or operation of a humanitarian nature directed toward an individual or group of individuals while at work or outside of work.
Civilian Service Award
This medal is the Department's highest award for service and may be awarded to employees who distinguish themselves by performing exceptional service in a duty of great responsibility or of critical importance to law enforcement.
Civilian Unit Award
This citation is the Department's highest unit award and may be awarded to an organizational unit of the Department for bravery or outstanding service by its employees functioning as a team.
Chief Awards
The Chief awards the Civilian of the Year, Officer of the Year, Unit of the Year and Chief's Special Recognition.

2016 Awardees

Partner in Public Safety: Lowell Bodily

Lowell has been a long-time help to the Salt Lake City Police Department, also working with the Environmental Health Division of the Health Department. For many years, he has tirelessly done what it takes to enhance the department’s goals for the community. He is a valuable asset to the police department, and as his job isn’t widely visible to the public, he hasn’t received the accolades he deserves for his contribution to public safety.

For his many years of assistance, Lowell Bodily is awarded the Partner in Public Safety.

Partner in Public Safety: Corey and Heather Young

Heather Young and Corey Draper were on their way home from work late at night and had to stop in the roadway due to a traffic hazard. A truck had lost a load of pallets, which scattered boards, nails and debris across 900 W at 1947 S. The young couple stopped their cars and risked their safety on the dark highway to remove the hazard to prevent other motorists from sustaining damage or potential injury.

For their actions, Corey Draper and Heather Young are presented with the Partner in Public Safety award.

Partner in Public Safety: Tolina Tausinga

Tolina Tausinga is a Gang Outreach worker in Salt Lake City at the Neighbor works center. She works with youth in our community that are at Gang involved or at risk for Gang activity. Tolina who has seen firsthand how gangs can ruin lives and pull families apart, has overcome her own personal tragedy and is now working on the front lines to help young kids. Her work has helped kids who otherwise would not have had the chance to graduate from High School and go on to live happy productive lives. There have been at least 10 young people (I am sure there are a lot more) who would not have graduated from High School in 2015 if not for her outreach efforts. Tolina spends much of her own personal time going out and finding kids who are failing and have dropped out of school, meeting with their parents and school administrators to get the kids back in to a school program where they can be successful. Tolina takes the time to reach out to so many at risk youth and let them know that she believes they can succeed and goes the extra mile to show them how to accomplish it as well. Tolina has also been an integral part of the SLCPD Community Advisory Board, offering critical insight and guidance.

For making Salt Lake a better place one student at a time, we recognize Tolina Tausinga as a Partner in Public Safety.

Police Star: Officer Steve Huggins

Officer Steve Huggins was working a part-time security detail at the City Creek Center Mall on October 23, 2015, when he noticed a young woman who had climbed over the railing of the elevated bridge/walkway. The young woman appeared to be very distraught and looked like she was getting ready to jump in an effort to end her life.

Officer Huggins and civilian mall security Officer Riley Steed jumped into action, running to the girl, who was now in the process of lowering herself into a position of jumping, and grabber her wrist. Officer Huggins and Mr. Steed wrestled with her as she tried to push away from them, at times nearly being pulled over the rail by her efforts. They worked to wrestle her back up and over the rail and continued to try and calm and contain her until SLC Fire arrived to transport her. It was noted by the General Manager of the mall that despite the employees and on-lookers hailing their actions as heroic, they shrugged it off as just another day and went back to their regular duties.

With great pride and appreciation for their heroic and lifesaving actions, Officer Steve Huggins is awarded the Police Star, and Security Officer Riley Steed is awarded the Public Service Star.

Public Service Star: Riley Steed

Officer Steve Huggins was working a part-time security detail at the City Creek Center Mall on October 23, 2015, when he noticed a young woman who had climbed over the railing of the elevated bridge/walkway. The young woman appeared to be very distraught and looked like she was getting ready to jump in an effort to end her life.

Officer Huggins and civilian mall security Officer Riley Steed jumped into action, running to the girl, who was now in the process of lowering herself into a position of jumping, and grabber her wrist. Officer Huggins and Mr. Steed wrestled with her as she tried to push away from them, at times nearly being pulled over the rail by her efforts. They worked to wrestle her back up and over the rail and continued to try and calm and contain her until SLC Fire arrived to transport her. It was noted by the General Manager of the mall that despite the employees and on-lookers hailing their actions as heroic, they shrugged it off as just another day and went back to their regular duties.

With great pride and appreciation for their heroic and lifesaving actions, Officer Steve Huggins is awarded the Police Star, and Security Officer Riley Steed is awarded the Public Service Star.

Public Service Medal of Valor: Joshua Earl

Joshua Earl lives near 100 S 300 E. Officers responded to a male on the 4th floor balcony threatening to jump to his death. Officers forced entry into the apartment but he threatened to jump if officers got closer. The man was standing outside the safety railing, holding on. While he was talking to officers, Joshua took the initiative to climb an exterior fire escape ladder to the 4th floor, even though he was, in his own words, terrified of heights. He then stepped to the balcony the man was on and put his arm around him to keep him from jumping or falling. Upon realizing what was happening, the man (who is significantly larger than Joshua) let go of the railing to jump. Officers grabbed his arm and pulled him into the apartment. Had Joshua not risked his life to save the man (who he did not know), officers on scene feel it is very likely that he would have jumped causing himself serious injury or death.

For his brave and selfless actions, Joshua Earl is awarded the Public Service Medal of Valor.

Civilian Service Award: Allie Webb

Allie Webb has worked for the Salt Lake City Police Department for just three years, but has made a big impact on the operations of the finance department. Her willingness to help and cheerful demeanor make her a great asset in the Finance Department. She is eager to assist in any way she can, and takes on tasks and jobs without complaint. She stays late, moves appointments around to help employees with their travel plans, and is willing to help with other officer needs that are beyond her normal scope of work.

For her actions, Allie Webb is awarded the Civilian Service Award.

Civilian Service Award: Jennifer Drysdale

Jennifer’s duties include oversight, storage, issuance, and recovery of department assets, forms, uniforms, and supplies. During the last year, Jennifer has found ways to save the city money and has continued to find other areas to cut costs and decrease spending. Some of those ways include changing vendors, arranging special pricing, and finding less expensive alternatives to what has previously been used.

Recently, she found a way for the department to save considerable money. By going through the bills each month, transferring plans, and making adjustments to our accounts, Jennifer found that by some simple adjustments, we were able to save between $24,000 and $30,000 this year alone without minimizing any of the service we provide. Jennifer went above and beyond her duties in finding this benefit for the department and, by doing so, has saved the city a great deal of money and provided an invaluable service to employees of this department.

For her actions, Jennifer Drysdale is presented with the Civilian Service Award.

Police Meritorious Unit Citation: Crime Lab Unit

In the Sunday morning hours, several Crime Lab Technicians responded, without hesitation, to assist in processing the scene of a fallen officer. Many hours were spent carefully and purposefully documenting the events that occurred. Particular attention should be given to Crime Lab Technician J. Montero (79L) for processing, finding, and lifting a fingerprint from the suspect’s vehicle involved in the traffic accident. Several latent prints were lifted from the inside of this vehicle. Upon running the license plates in AFIS, an identification was made and the person was apprehended.

For their actions, Crime Lab Unit Members Jennifer Montero, Diane Shafter, Scott Curtis, Cody Nixon, Holly Arguello, Hoa Tring, Derek Mears, Matt Throckmorton, and Courtney Person are awarded the Police Meritorious Unit Citation:

Derek Mears
Holly Arguello
Scott Curtis
Jennifer Montero
Cody Nixon
Courtney Person
Matt Throckmorton
Hoa Trinh
Diane Shafter

Police Meritorious Unit Citation: Retail Theft Unit

Sgt. Bench and his Retail Theft Detectives Mark Falkner, Jamie Nelson and Vicky Aubrey developed and implemented a pilot program to address the ever-growing number of retail thefts at Walmart. Their tireless work, both at Walmart as well as the SLCDAO and SLCPO has resulted in a major reduction in time spent by patrol processing shoplifters and the creation of a template guided by requirements to the state code for retail theft. What once took 1-2+ hours can now be accomplished much more quickly because Sgt. Bench and his detectives didn’t give up on driving these much-needed changes. Patrol can now drop video evidence in a secure drop box at the Pioneer precinct at the end of their shifts instead of having to drive to the Evidence facility, saving even more time and putting more officers back on the streets more quickly. The online reporting system used by Walmart now allows loss prevention to essentially complete the entire GO with the template. This allows the responding patrol officer to simply complete a supplemental report instead of duplicating what the loss prevention officer already wrote. Each of these detectives carries a heavy case load and these changes have made them more efficient when screening cases because of the uniformity.

For their actions, the Retail Theft Unit is awarded the Police Meritorious Unit Citation:

Sgt. Dale Bench
Det. Vicky Aubrey
Det. Mark Falkner
Det. Jamie Nelson

Police Meritorious Service Medal: Officer Dave Hendricks

Patrol Officers were asked to take time out of their already busy call load and schedule to proactively look for individuals who were victimizing the Rose Park area and surrounding districts with robberies and burglaries. On January 14, 2016, Dave noticed a vehicle that was earlier described as the victim vehicle taken in a carjacking. After notifying other officers of the car, Dave was able to organize and make a high-hazard stop on the vehicle.

The occupants of the vehicle fled on foot in several directions. With Dave’s knowledge of the area, and skill as a veteran officer, he was able to calmly and in a very organized fashion direct other responding officers into positions of containment on the surrounding blocks, resulting in the capture of all four occupants.

Two of these individuals had outstanding warrants for previous robberies and other charges. They were removed from the streets of the city, putting at least a temporary halt to their ongoing crime spree. The vehicle was returned to a very appreciative victim, and was followed up by the recovery of a stolen bike that was also returned to the owner.

On their own merits, these actions are worthy of this award; however, if you mention the name Dave Hendricks to any supervisor or peer, you would be caught up in a never-ending conversation and examples of how this is a daily activity for Dave. He has become a legend in his time when it comes to unmatched work ethic, knowledge, and skill as a police officer. This all from a guy who says very little, never boasts of his actions, and always gives credit to others.

Dave has spent his entire 35 year plus career in patrol doing this same caliber of work every day. He is an invaluable asset to the department and especially to the community. He retired from the department a few years back, to our dismay. Fortunately, he could not stay away, and one of the brightest days for us came when he could no longer avoid the call, and he returned to the work he loves.

For these actions and his continued outstanding service to the residents of Salt Lake City, Officer Dave Hendricks is awarded the Police Meritorious Service Medal.

Police Meritorious Service Medal: Wendy Isom

Wendy is an empowering victim advocate and PD employee. Wendy first and foremost cares about her staff and shows this by helping with cases and giving wise advice about how to best help victims of crimes. Wendy empowers her staff by showing respect to them and trusting their judgement, and offers help when it’s requested, without reservation. Wendy goes out of her way to help victims of crimes by taking extra on call shifts, when we are short employees. On top of her many responsibilities, she will still attend court and provide the best advocacy a victim could receive by explaining the court process and helping victims with whatever they need. She an advocate for victims at the YWCA and internally at the police department by being an example of respect to all victims with whom she works. She is great at helping victims see all the options available to them and helps them see that there is a way to get help, even when it appears that the system says there is not. She makes sure that victims are safe and well taken care of, even when they can seem burdensome to others.

For her commitment and actions, Wendy Isom is awarded the Meritorious Service Medal.

Police Meritorious Service Medal: Officer Mikah Lindquist

On January 30th 2016, Officer Lindquist was the initial officer on a Robbery at the Subway located at 1645 W. 700 N. Officer Lindquist took excellent notes during the investigation. The unidentified suspect, who had left on foot, was not found that day.

The very next day Officer Lindquist responded to a domestic violence call in an area just a couple blocks away from the Subway. Upon arrival, Officer Lindquist was able to get suspect information and confirmed the suspect in the domestic aggravated assault case was the suspect from the robbery at Subway. Officer Lindquist responded to an adjacent apartment where the man was hiding. Several attempts were made by the residents of the apartment to throw Officer Lindquist off the trail of the suspect. Officer Lindquist was able to knock and talk his way into the apartment to find the suspect hiding in a closet. Robbery Detectives were called out and concluded the investigation.

On February 1st, (the day after the previous incident), Officer Lindquist located another robbery fugitive at Motel 6 located at 1990 W. North Temple. Officer Lindquist was able to run a license plate, find information that tied the suspect to the plate, and then ascertain what room the suspect was in and arrest him.

These are two examples of the extraordinary work that Officer Lindquist does every day, investigating thoroughly and as far as he can.

For his actions and determination, Officer Mikah Lindquist is awarded the Police Meritorious Service Medal.

Police Meritorious Service Medal: Officer Dustin Marshall

Detective Dustin  Marshall has been assigned to district one in the CIU unit since May of 2015. He has exemplified himself by going above and beyond to make his district safe. For years, the area of 1000 W. North Temple has been overrun with drugs/prostitution and petty crime. Many officers have attempted to resolve this problem, with limited success. Detective Marshall approached the problem in a direct manner, using problem-oriented solutions and by engaging the stake holders. Detective Marshall set out to ensure that all North Temple businesses had no trespassing affidavits on file, that they took advantage of environmental design – that they took a more proactive approach towards preventing crime by removing shrubs, installing camera and fixing lighting and reporting problems. Detective Marshall encouraged commitment to the community, he fostered cooperation amongst the business owners, and instilled a sense of community. By developing relationships and seeking partnerships, Detective Marshall has been able to significantly reduce the criminal element from the area. Detective Marshall’s actions have not gone unnoticed; several citizens as well as Council Members have indicated how appreciative they are of Detective Marshall’s efforts. Detective Marshall employed the same consensus building technique to solve problems out at the International center. He organized the motels and area businesses and helped them to be more proactive in crime prevention. He employed out-of-the-box techniques to reduce crime.

For his actions, Officer Dustin Marshall is awarded the Police Meritorious Service Medal.

Police Meritorious Service Medal: Sergeant Todd Mitchell

Due to a new law, there was a need to redo the Officer Involved Critical Incident Protocol. Sergeant Mitchell reached out to other police agencies in the valley to find a protocol that would work well for SLCPD as well as the other agencies involved. Sgt. Mitchell set up several meetings with other agencies, including the District Attorney, to come up with a common practice that would benefit all the agencies as well as satisfy the new law requirements.

Over several months, Sgt. Mitchell wrote and re-wrote the protocol until he was able to come up with a workable solution and the new protocol was published. He has also spent time teaching the new protocol in training. He is passionate about following the law as well as treating the parties fairly. It is because of his attention to detail, his ability to bring people together, and his desire to address and solve problems that the protocol is in place and working well.

For his actions, Sergeant Todd Mitchell is awarded the Police Meritorious Service Medal.

Police Distinguished Service Medal: Christina Judd

Director Christina Judd has been with the Department for less than a year. In that time she has demonstrated competence, guidance, and strong leadership. She has pulled together most of the Department, influencing everyone with her organizational ability, intellect, and candor. She provides sound advice including well-founded and well-researched community-oriented and creative policing concepts. Arriving here from her prior role as the City Events Coordinator, she quickly assumed her PR Director role and pressed forward with positive changes for the squad. She has demonstrated proper decision-making, a coolness and circumspect approach under pressure, and can always be counted on to make proper decisions. We all defer to her now for guidance with almost everything we do. She has the right answers and works well with everyone in the Department. Christi Judd has a strong moral and ethical standard as well, which we recognize and which compels us, as her squad members, to support her and do the right thing at all times. Moreover, she is a member of the Air Force Reserve, recently selected to attend an Air Force Officer’s Academy. Her military bearing is apparent, as well as her mission-oriented approach to her responsibilities, yet remaining mindful of the welfare of her subordinates.

For her strong and invaluable leadership, Christina Judd is awarded the Distinguished Service Medal.

Police Distinguished Service Medal: Brittany Nelson

Brittany Nelson was assigned to work on identifying fingerprints from a 1991 cold case homicide. During this process, Brittany had the forethought to review all of the fingerprint evidence and noted that one of the latent print cards had what appeared to be blood on it. This fingerprint was lifted from the bloody knife that was located in the suspect vehicle in 1991. In 1991, all of the blood from the knife was consumed to perform blood typing, which was all that was available at that time. Tech Nelson notified the detective assigned to the case that this fingerprint card, which was lifted from the knife, had what appeared to be blood on it. Tech Nelson preserved this evidence. This turned out to be a very critical piece of evidence because this blood was tested and found to belong to the victim in the case, thus documenting that this in fact was the murder weapon in this 1991 cold case homicide. Because of Tech Nelson’s attention to detail and communication with detectives, this evidence allowed for the arrest of the two suspects.

For her actions, Brittany Nelson is awarded the Police Distinguished Service Medal.

Police Distinguished Service Medal: Sergeant Jeff Webb

Sergeant Jeff Webb has a new assignment, but spent years as a Patrol Sergeant. He is punctual, articulate, and very knowledgeable. He demonstrates every positive quality you would expect from an exemplary leader with the Salt Lake Police Department. However, Sgt. Webb goes above and beyond with his personnel. A few examples are as follows: he is always available for a question about policy and makes sure you understand his response in-full when a question is answered. If uncertain of a code to use, Sgt. Webb is always available with recommendations for appropriate resources. He has been known to contact the DA’s office and City Attorney in order to define codes on how they will be perceived in court. He conducts up-to-date training which he has researched on his own and shares these ideas during line-ups. Monthly physical workouts were performed on Sgt. Webb’s squad in order to build unity and fitness. He conducted training for a possible UTA bus assault which he coordinated with the Training Department and UTA. He conducted active shooter training, during which he utilized SWAT members on his squad to train. He has coordinated and conducted defensive tactic training for his squad. He was also responsible for updating the Field Training Officer program for the department. Sgt. Webb researched multiple FTO programs throughout the country, took the ideas he thought would work and integrated them into our program. Not only has he developed an FTO program that is very successful, but he has also overseen multiple classes of new recruits and has held FTOs to a higher standard. In conclusion, he continues to lead his officers by example and wouldn’t ask an officer to perform any duty that he wouldn’t do himself. It is truly an honor to have worked under Sgt. Webb’s guidance.

For his dedicated service, Sgt. Jeff Webb is awarded the Police Distinguished Service Medal.

Police Purple Heart: Detective Brad Davis

At approximately 10:30 am on Thursday, April 15, 1999, a gunman entered the LDS Church Family History Library and opened fire, killing two people and wounding two others. Officer Brad Davis responded and entered the building, while the shooter was still active inside. Officer Davis was shot in the hand by the gunman.

For his personal injury, in the line of duty 17 years ago, Detective Brad Davis is awarded the Police Purple Heart.

Lifesaving Award: Officer Bron Cruz

On July 11th 2015, Officer Bron Cruz responded to 1700 W 1300 N on a stabbing that had just occurred. Officer Cruz was the first officer to arrive on scene and found a man laying on the grass with a stab wound in the center of his chest. The victim was unconscious and had no pulse. Officer Cruz began chest compressions and continued for several minutes until SLCFD arrived and took over life saving measures. The victim was transported to IMC in D- condition where they found that the stab wound had punctured his heart. After immediately being taken in for emergency surgery, Doctors were able to repair the damage to the heart and the man was upgraded to stable condition. Without Officer Cruz quickly taking action and performing chest compressions, it is unlikely that the man would have survived the incident.

For his quick actions, Officer Bron Cruz is presented the Life Saving Award.

Chief's Special Recognition: Officer Kim Crockett

On November 30, 2015, Officers Kim Crockett and Dave Hendricks were working on special assignment in the area of 1910 West North Temple when they were flagged down by the victim of a car prowl.

A woman was in the process of moving from North Carolina to Oregon when she stopped for the night at the North Temple Motel 6. When she returned to her vehicle, she discovered that someone had broken the driver’s side window and had taken her suitcase from the car. The victim was distraught, as she was attempting this cross-country move with very limited means and had no funds for replacing the window.

Taking into account the extreme cold temperatures, the distance she had to travel, and the welfare of the woman and her dog, Kim went to work to help her out. With very notable compassion, Kim researched local auto glass replacement companies and found one that had the correct window in stock. This, in itself, may have been more than one would expect the officer to do; however, Kim took it upon herself to go beyond that. Kim arranged for the glass company to replace the window and paid for the service out of her own pocket, to the tune of nearly $300 dollars.

Officer Crockett’s actions exemplify a police officer who genuinely cares about the community and individuals she serves.

For these actions, Officer Kim Crockett is being awarded the Chief’s Special Recognition

Chief's Special Recognition: CJ (Carol) Prisbey

Records Supervisor CJ Prisbrey has had over 40 years of exceptional performance. She has worked to ensure compliance with the FBI reporting requirements under the NIBRS program. She has set a monthly goal of less than 1% error rate in the report submitted to the FBI. CJ has also demonstrated dedication to the community and department by reviewing HREADR queues, and rerouting serious case reports to ensure follow up is conducted in a timely manner. Due to her attention to detail and institutional knowledge of Versadex, CJ has successfully researched and located key information and reports for officers and detectives on a daily basis. She has selflessly served in Records and uses her vast knowledge to supervise, train, and mentor her coworkers on a daily basis.

For her long years of dedicated service, Supervisor CJ Prisbrey is awarded the Chief’s Special Recognition.

Chief's Civilian Employee of the Year: Roberta Mixon

Roberta Mixon employs her eye for detail and organizational skills in every task she works on. She takes every job she is assigned, as well as all the tasks she notices need to be completed, and gives her all to complete them. She diligently answers phone call after phone call and never loses her professional demeanor. She listens to what people need and helps them resolve as many matters as possible, thereby reducing the need for people to be transferred. She always accepts new tasks and questions with a smile.

In addition to handling the inbound calls to the information line, she has spent several hours outside of work volunteering her time gathering and recording information for the development of the Fallen Officer timeline. Her efforts have helped document the department’s history and helped create a great mapping device that will be used for reference yearly.

For her dedicated actions, Roberta Mixon is awarded the Chief’s Civilian of the Year.

Chief's Unit of the Year: Patrol Bureau

The Patrol Bureau is the foundation of the Salt Lake City Police Department. It doesn’t get much of the attention or the recognition of the specialty units, but provides the services and people who are the first responders in times of need. The Bureau is comprised of hardworking, selfless, and devoted officers, Sergeants, and Lieutenants, who serve the public. They respond to crises, calls for help, shots fired, fights, and domestic violence. They are there to assist after an accident, at the scene of a death, and during moments of uncertainty and danger. They head to the trouble, while others flee to safety. They are there, day in and day out, during every holiday and in the middle of the night. They take thousands of calls every year.

For their largely unrecognized dedication and hard work to ensure the safety of Salt Lake City, the Patrol Bureau is awarded the Chief’s Unit of the Year.

Chief's Officer of the Year and Medal of Valor: Officer Ben Hone

Officer Ben Hone responded to Roberta St. on a Burglary Just Occurred. Upon arriving and while waiting for additional officers to arrive, Officer Hone heard screams for help. The screams came from a house further south on Roberta St. Officer Hone felt that he could not wait for additional officers and responded to the cries for help. As Officer Hone entered the address, he found a woman stabbed in the abdomen and the suspect located in the basement holding the woman with one arm and a knife in the other. The subject refused to comply with orders to release the woman and drop the knife. The subject, a walk away from a halfway house, was subsequently shot by Officer Hone. The stabbing victim was transported by Gold Cross and Fire to UMC. Officer Hone’s quick actions brought this situation to the best possible conclusion. Both women (sisters) had been in the fight of their lives. Had Officer Hone not acted as quickly and professionally as he did, the victim, and perhaps her sister, may have lost their lives to a determined fugitive.

For performing courageous acts involving personal hazard in saving human life, Officer Benjamin Hone is awarded the Medal of Valor, and the Chief’s Officer of the Year.

Partner in Public Safety and Salt Lake City Mayor's Award: Karla Bartholomew

Karla closely works with all aspects of the police department, through the Environmental Health Division of the Health Department. She has shown a willingness to do what it takes to enhance the department’s goals for the community. An example of this can been seen through the collaborative effort that she exhibits when she is contacted for cleanup of a transient camp, helping in gathering abandoned property around the city, willingness to coordinate resources to clean a lot, sidewalk or a business parking lot. She is also involved in cleaning camps from the Jordan Parkway. Many times the conditions are so deplorable, she will have to done a safety suit so she does not become contaminated herself. She is a valuable asset to the police department, her expertise, her willingness, and ability to just get the job done is appreciated all by those who have called her. Karla never backs down from a problem, and is willing to help fix it, or find a solution in order for the Public and us as police officers are safe. Karla was very instrumental in cleaning up 500 W Commons last year, in taking the time to post several abandoned camps, talking and dealing with those in the area to resolve what is considered property and what has been abandoned. After two or three truckloads of property taken, the commons again was cleaned.

For her dedicated work, Karla Bartholomew is awarded the Partner in Public Safety/Mayor’s Award.

Police Star and SLCFD's Medal of Gallantry: Patrol Officers

On December 22, 2015, Lieutenant Gleason, Sergeant Eldard, and Officer Thornblad responded to a house fire at 1100 South 700 East. The house was engulfed in flames and the family had fled to the street. When the officers were made aware that a three year old child was still inside, they made a heroic effort to rescue her. Officer Thornblad made entry through the front door and looked for the child without success. Officer Thornblad was driven back outside by heat, thick smoke, and hot embers. Sergeant Eldard broke out a window in an attempt at rescue, but was also driven back by smoke and heat. Lieutenant Gleason put his head in through the broken window and was able to visually locate the child on the floor, under a fallen Christmas tree. Lieutenant Gleason was able to direct arriving fire crews to the location of the little girl, who survived the fire and was transported to the hospital.

For their action, Lieutenant Craig Gleason, Sergeant Robert Eldard, and Officer James Thornblad are each awarded the Medal of Gallantry:

Lieutenant Craig Gleason
Sergeant Robert Eldard
Officer James Thornblad

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